Charmed By Shakespeare
Much Ado About Nothing
Twelfth Night
Henry VI, Part II
Henry VI, Part I
A Midsummer Night's Dream
Richard III
Henry VI, Part III

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Last Of the Quotes From A Midsummer Night;s Dream. July 30, 2015 12:00 AM

~~The lunatic, the lover, and the poet,
Are of imagination all compact:
One sees more devils than vast hell can hold,
That is, the madman; the lover, all as frantic,
Sees Helen's beauty in a brow of Egypt:
The poet's eye, in a fine frenzy rolling,
Doth glance from heaven to earth, from earth to heaven;
And, as imagination bodies forth
The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen
Turns them to shapes, and gives to airy nothing
A local habitation and a name.
Such tricks hath strong imagination,
That, if it would but apprehend some joy,
It comprehends some bringer of that joy;
Or in the night, imagining some fear,
How easy is a bush supposed a bear! (5.1.7)
What revels are in hand? Is there no play,
To ease the anguish of a torturing hour? (5.1.36)
A tedious brief scene of young Pyramus
And his love Thisbe: very tragical mirth.
Merry and tragical! tedious and brief!
That is, hot ice and wondrous strange snow. (5.1.56)
For never anything can be amiss,
When simpleness and duty tender it. (5.1.82)
Out of this silence yet I picked a welcome;
And in the modesty of fearful duty
I read as much as from the rattling tongue
Of saucy and audacious eloquence. (5.1.100)
If we offend, it is with our good will.
That you should think, we come not to offend,
But with good will. To show our simple skill,
That is the true beginning of our end.
Consider then we come but in despite.
We do not come as minding to content you,
Our true intent is. All for your delight,
We are not here. (5.1.108)
Whereat, with blade, with bloody blameful blade,
He bravely broached his boiling bloody breast. (5.1.148)
The best in this kind are but shadows, and the worst are no worse, if imagination amend them. (5.1.215)
The iron tongue of midnight hath told twelve;
Lovers, to bed; 'tis almost fairy time. (5.1.372)
Now the hungry lion roars,
And the wolf behowls the moon;
Whilst the heavy ploughman snores,
All with weary task fordone. (5.2.1)
Not a mouse
Shall disturb this hallowed house:
I am sent with broom before,
To sweep the dust behind the door. (5.2.17)
If we shadows have offended,
Think but this, and all is mended,
That you have but slumbered here
While these visions did appear. (5.2.54)

 


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